Social Sciences

Why Do I Blush at the Start of a Speech?

The mechanics of how a blush happens are straightforward. Underneath the skin of your face and neck is a lacework of tiny blood vessels called capillaries, which dilate under the influence of adrenaline to allow more blood and oxygen to flow. And a blush isn’t something you can fake. Unlike most human expressions, you can’t force a blush to appear on your face. (Or, sadly, demand that your capillaries shrink back to size.) (Read the full story)

Famous Speech Friday: Sarah Winnemucca’s San Francisco lectures

The last time the Malheur region of Oregon made the national news, it was the 19th century, and it was yet another story of armed occupation and mistrust. The Paiute people living on the Malheur Reservation were caught in the middle of a 1878 war between the Bannock people and the U.S. military, during which a young Paiute woman called Sarah Winnemucca worked as a translator and diplomat. (Read the full story)